About your Search

20121222
20121230
Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)
>> brown: seven weeks after election day, there are open seats in congress. we look at contests in three senate races. >> ifill: fred de sam lazaro profiles a priest who became a doctor to help haiti's poor and orphaned children. >> brown: and we close with a conversation with the editor of a new anthology of verse: 100 poems written over 100 years. >> it doesn't have poetry. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: gunfire tore at the nation's holiday mood again today, with the emotional wounds from a school massacre still fresh. there were more fatal shootings, inclu
finance minister. >> reporter: the parliament of japan has elected shinzo abe as the country's seventh prime minister in six years. abe was sworn in today after being chosen by his conservative-leaning liberal democratic party. the party won power in this month's elections, for the first time since 2009. abe has called for bold measures to bolster japan's ailing economy. he previously served as prime minister from 2006 to 2007. russian lawmakers gave final approval today to a ban on americans adopting russian children. it's part of a series of reactions to a u.s. sanctions law targeting russian human rights abusers. in washington today, a state department spokesman called the ban misguided. and adoption groups in moscow said it would harm children most. >> ( translated ): today we don't have that number of russian families who are willing to adopt, and the children who go to adopted families abroad are the children that russian families wouldn't take. there must be at least five refusals by russian families for the child to go to foreign parents. for that reason i don't see within this
up the news of this holiday. then, part two of our conversation about upcomingin elections: house races in illinois and south carolina, an high-profile politics in new jersey. we have two health stories. first, are annual mammogramswn necessary? betty ann bowser examines theil conflicting answers.or >> it's going to result in an excessive treatment required for people that delay getting their cancer detected.re >> ifill: plus, 2013 will be am pivotal year for the new health care reform law. ray suarez gets an update from julie rovner of npr. from the island of mindanao in the philippines, fred de sam lazaro profiles a group of peacekeepers struggling to maintain a fragile cease-fire between government and rebel forces.o >> there are many other organizations that do medical care and food provisions. never enough. what is new here is civilians protecting civilians. >> ifill: itn's john sparks reports on police officers in china, and their accusations of widespread corruption by local officials. and jeffrey brown samples the poetry about greece's financial woes and its austerity meas
ultimately burned seven homes. the election commission in egypt confirmed today the new constitution won nearly 64% of the vote in a referendum. the panel also reported turnout was just a third of the country's 52 million registered voters. president mohammed morsi and his muslim brotherhood backed the draft constitution. opponents warned it paves the way for islamic rule and curbsd on civil liberties. the six persian gulf arab nations demanded an end to what they called iranian interference. they issued a statement today as the end of the gulf cooperation council's annual summit. the statement gave no details. the six u.s.-allied countries also called for swift international action to end the bloodshed in syria.in in central asia, a military plane crashed early this morning in kazakhstan, killing 27in people, including the country's head of border security.ll the russian-made aircraft went down near the southern city of shymkent. the dead also included seven crew members and 19 border guards. there was no immediate word on the cause of the crash, but kazakhstan has been plagued by heavy
after being tapped by hawaii's governor. the new senator said he'll seek election in his own right, in 2014. inouye wanted hawaii congresswoman colleen hanabusa to take his seat. she said today she respects the governor's choice. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to margaret. >> warner: we turn now to russia, where a proposed new law on adoptions, causing alarm in the united states, came a step closer to being enacted today. ray suarez has the story. >> reporter: in moscow today, president vladimir putin said he does intend to sign a bill that bars americans from adopting russian children. >> you know, after all in the world there are probably a lot places where the quality of life is better than here, but so what? are we going to send all the children there? maybe we should move there ourselves. we need to support the proposal which is directed at doing everything in our own country in order to provide for a worthy future for all of our children. >> reporter: yesterday, russian lawmakers gave final approval to the legislation. it was, pointedly, named after a ru
against women in their country? >> well, all elected governments are-- their hands are always tied by the social morees and cultural constriction of that country, their own country and india is a thriving democracy but it is also very conservative. and there are many traditions which would prevent those kibsd of things that from happening. so i think it's great that we have female leaders right now, the head of the governing party in india is a woman but that doesn't mean that she can make her only issue that of women's issues. if the rest of the government isn't going to follow along, india's government is very constricted in many ways from what it can do. so unfortunately this hasn't been made a big case, a big issue of yet so far but i actually think that this could be the time. i think that this case could give an opening. >> well, news from singapore of the young woman's death after the gang rape broke during the middle of the night in the india. so indians in their millions will awake to the news that the woman has died. have we crossed a threshold. is this an issue that simp
it possible that the elect one, the messiah, the righteous one, the holy one"-- any title they use of jesus-- "is it possible that such a one could be oppressed, persecuted, and executed?" they go into the hebrew scriptures, and, of course, what they find is that it's almost like a job description of being god's righteous one, to be persecuted and even executed. >> and the amazing thing is, they said, "hey, pilate's right. he was the king of the jews. and, moreover, god has vindicated this claim that he is the king of the jews by raising him from the dead." >> ( dramatized ): an angel of the lord, descending from heaven, came and rolled back the stone. he said to the women, "jesus who was crucified, he has been raised. come, see the place where he lay." >> the stories about the resurrection in the gospels make two very clear points: first of all, that jesus really, really was dead; and secondly, that his disciples really and with absolute conviction saw him again afterwards. the gospels are equally clear that it's not a ghost. i mean, even though the raised jesus walks through a shut door i
was somehow rooted in the press buyas or elected officials who have gun-free school zones. you know, judy, the reality is, and it's a terrible reality, since robert kennedy died in the ambassador hotel on june 4th, 1968, more americans have died from gunfire than died in all the war, all the wars of this country's history, from the revolutionary to the civil war, world war i, world war ii, and those 43 years. we have half the guns 245 are in the world are in the united states. i mean guns are a problem. and i think they still have to be confronted. >> woodruff: something like 280 million guns. >> we're to the going to get rid of all those guns. that's to the going to happen. >> daniel patrick moynihan and tax ammunition. >> i think there are a series of reasonable things we could do, even going back to the 1990s when it comes to ammunition, magazine size, and the sought-- certain types of semiautomatic weapons. you should be able to make that case. we swung so far in this debate in the libertarian direction, that those are fairly minimal burdens on anyone's rights when it comes to this. i
Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)